Red Shoes Rock and 99 Days to FASDay

20 Years of FASDay – Red Shoes Rocks steps us up to the celebration finish line building awareness #FASD #REDSHOESROCK

our sacred breath

On June 1 the international movement to bring awareness to Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder began with the start of Red Shoes Rock to Stop FASD and the 99 Days to FASDay. There have been some exciting new additions to this year’s campaign.

Red Shoes Rock: Start the Conversation

Red Shoes Rock 18 logoFor the 5th Anniversary, a new logo, and tag line (Start the Conversation) were created, along with a dedicated website: Red Shoes Rock ~ but before I get into that, let’s take a step back and look at how the red shoe movement began.

I asked Jodee Kulp, one of the co-founders, how this came to be.

In 2013 R.J. Formanek, an adult (and Canadian!) with FASD decided to wear red shoes. He  wanted to stand out and be noticed. He chose red shoes as a way to express his individuality and remind himself that he is unique. And red shoes get noticed…

View original post 841 more words

Meet Val – #12 of 90 Real People with #FASD

FASD WITH HOPE

MEET VAL – I’m sober since 2005. And despite losing all my family I have maintained my sobriety…I trusted professionals and still do and today “Thanks to professionals, I can help others in many ways….I encourage people…I continue to look for a brighter side to life.

MY STORY – I am a 57 year old woman having FASD will challenge myself this Sept to go back into the military and train our young cadets…despite my FASD.

STRENGTHS – “I NEVER GIVE UP ON ME.”

STRUGGLES – Struggles started when I was 3 right until sept 2005 —between foster homes and failing in school, failing with friends , failing in my jobs, relationships and even being a parent . All areas of my life where a big huge puzzle that I had no clue how to begin. Thanks to some time in the army and professionals they helped me heal and…

View original post 60 more words

Meet Christopher – #46 of 90 Real People. Real Lives. #FASD

FASD WITH HOPE

MEET CHRISTOPHER – I am passionate about music: creating, discovering and sharing the positive benefits it has for people with developmental disabilities, especially those with an FASD diagnosis. I am fascinated with the brain, how it works and how music effects it. I love animals, museums, go karts, theatrical epicness.

 MY STORY:

There I was
Standing there.
No fear.
No nervousness.
I remember…I could see everything
Then..

I jumped

I was six years old when I picked myself up off the ground. I had hurt my ankle, nothing more. Nobody had noticed I had jumped off the roof of the mobile home I lived in. The very place of which I had already been exposed to things no six year old (or any child) should know, see and experience. I learned fear, cowardice, abandonment and how to run. I failed to thrive and lived in the foster care system from…

View original post 636 more words

Meet Tisha – #44 of 90 Real People. Real Lives. #FASD

Thank you Tisha for being another adult standing up to build awareness and knowledge for the little ones coming behind you.

FASD WITH HOPE

Mac got really excited when Tisha decided to run with us! She is from South Africa – so on his way around the globe he stopped by to pick her up.

MEET TISHA – Tisha is 20. She came into our family at 10 weeks old as she was abandoned at birth. She was a premature baby with a lot of challenges and wasn’t expected to live more than a few days after she came to her family.

MY STORY – I am 20 and had to attend special needs school. I have a full-time job that I love and have friends. I like watching YouTube. I cannot read or write or do numbers. I have difficulty remembering.

STRENGTHS – I like people and I am friendly.  I have a full time job. I try my best. I talk about FASD to warn women about drinking alcohol when pregnant.

STRUGGLES…

View original post 118 more words

Meet Vicky #30 – 90 Real People. Real Lives. #FASD

FASD WITH HOPE

We are doing this Vicky and TODAY is your day — You are runner number 30 – Thank you so much for sharing your story and stepping out to run with Mac!

MEET VICKY – I grew up in the foster care system and no one talked about FASD openly so I did not get much intervention until I was an adult. That is very sad as so often I did not know what was going on and became angry. As I grew older I found people who wanted to learn about my challenges and help me. I’m so grateful for that.

MY STORY – I am not sure when I was diagnosed but I was in foster care from when I was 18 months old till I was 18. Back then FASD wasn’t something anyone openly spoke about so I didn’t get much intervention. I grew up being a…

View original post 149 more words

Meet Chanel – #42 of 90 Real People. Real Lives. #FASD

FASD WITH HOPE

My name is Chanel Torres. I was born with FAS.

My mission is to help those who are living and dealing with FAS and to stop FAS in unborn babies.

To do this, I spend my free time giving presentations at local schools, hospitals, Juvenile Detention Centers, nursing programs and many other facilities. I educate as many people as I can on FAS and to give them a chance to get to know me and my struggles and to help spread the word about FAS. I have received many awards and certificates of appreciation for my hard work in delivering my message. These awards are great, but the biggest award I can get is to know my message is being delivered and helping many people and unborn babies out there.

When I made the decision to talk about FAS I was so excited because my goal in life is to…

View original post 1,171 more words

Meet Toya – #5 of 90 Real People with #FASD

FASD WITH HOPE

Day Five of our 90 Day Count Down to September 9 – And Mac has been busy collecting friends and sharing them. We are so appreciative of each of you! We’re loving the action. People are out strutting and jumping and rolling and climbing with their RedShoesRock.

MEET TOYA – Hi, I’m Toya and I was born in Sacramento California on July 4th 1995. I was 1 pound and 10 ounces at birth and I was born to an alcoholic. I am now 20 about to be 21 in just under 3 weeks from now and I have an FASD diagnosis of ARND (alcohol related neuro-developmental disorder). I have a learning disability in math but my IQ is well into the gifted range (above 140).

MY STORY – I was born prematurely, went through many foster homes, experienced abuse and neglect prior to age 5, I also had 3…

View original post 828 more words

Meet Emily – #32 of 90 Real People. Real Lives #FASD

FASD WITH HOPE

MEET EMILY — Emily possesses a passion for sharing her personal story, the story of so many, a story worth being told. She travels internationally educating and advocating on behalf this 100 percent preventable pandemic.

She has served as a member for SAMHSA’s Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) Center for Excellence Expert Panel. Currently, along with two other individuals with a diagnosis along the spectrum, Emily is conducting research collecting data on the physical ailments that arise in adults with an FASD diagnosis, a lifelong, full-body diagnosis.

Emily is a founding member of the first national self-advocacy network, Self-Advocates with a Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder in Action (SAFA). Though she was born addicted to alcohol and cocaine and had marijuana in her system, and though doctors told her adoptive parents she likely would never make it through school,

Emily graduated Summa Cum Laude, ranking number one of her graduating class…

View original post 211 more words

10 Things You Need to Know About #FASD

FASD WITH HOPE

90 Real People. Real Lives – Red Shoes Rock International Relay
Guest Blogger Ann Yurcek
Visit her blog at Parenting Complex Children

Day 10 Ten Things You Need to Know
About FASD (Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders)

  1. People with FASD have challenges due to no fault of their own.  They are innocent victims of Prenatal Alcohol exposure.
  2. FASD is complicated and no two people are alike. Prenatal alcohol exposure can cause damage to any system of the body.  In recent medical literature there were found to be over 400 different diagnoses and problems are associated with FAS.
  3. Most of the time FASD is invisible.   People with FASD can look normal, but struggle with normal. Only 1 out of 10 will have the visible physical characteristics associated with prenatal alcohol exposure.
  4. Most people with FASD will have a normal intelligence.  Some will have high intellect and still struggle.  The majority will need…

View original post 241 more words

Meet Andrew – #4 of 90 Real People with #FASD

FASD WITH HOPE

It’s Day 4 of our countdown to 90 days before International FASDay… Need some ideas for an event visit 60 Days of FASDay Countdown or go check our www.FASworld.com.

Today we have Andrew running as Mac’s friend.

Meet Andrew – He is a champion on the track and an inspiration at the podium. Having competed in running circles for 12 years, Andrew is competitive at every distance from the 400M to half-marathons. Over the past three years, he’s spoken from memory about his challenges from FASD but also his triumphs.

Andrewbaby-adultMY STORY – At three weeks of age, Andrew was found alone with his two-year-old sister. His birthmother was self-medicating with alcohol throughout the pregnancy. .

STRENGTHS – Although not a talker until age 6, he is gregarious and loves being around people. He’s always wanted to be included with his peers – willing to learn by watching.

STRUGGLES

View original post 130 more words