Well worn Red Shoes keep rocking for the journey ahead

RED SHOES ROCK THANKS Dr. Elizabeth Elliott
We appreciate ALL your HARD WORK!

My red shoes in the red Australian outback! Symbolic that FASD is prevalent in Australia, including in remote and Aboriginal communities. This painting of the Fitzroy Valley – where FASD prevalence is estimated to be 20% – was done by a senior woman Daisy Andrews. The shoes are well-worn through lots of hard work by many Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people, but still for wearing for the journey ahead.” — Liz Ellliot

Professor Elizabeth Elliott AM FAHMS

Professor Elliott has made an extraordinary contribution to healthcare in Australia, and has been a true pioneer in the FASD field. She has been involved in clinical services, research, advocacy and policy development regarding FASD in children, and alcohol use in pregnancy, for over 20 years. Her efforts have improved health care services in FASD and changed health outcomes for children and families living with and affected by FASD. Her contributions include:

Research

Professor Elliott is a researcher and Co-Director of the NHMRC Centre for Research Excellence on FASD (FASD Research Australia). She was lead paediatrician in the Lililwan Project to determine FASD in the remote Fitzroy Valley in the Kimberley, Western Australia and is a chief investigator on NHMRC projects to examine alcohol use in pregnancy and child outcomes in two Australian birth cohorts; to address behavioural problems in children with FASD (Jandu Yani U); to follow the Lililwan cohort into adolescence (Bigiswun project); and to introduce consistent practice regarding asking and advising on alcohol use in pregnancy. She has supervised 6 PhD students working on FASD and has over 400 publications in peer reviewed journals, technical reports, research reports, books, book chapters and editorials, which can be viewed here.

Advocacy and Policy

Professor Elliott added her voice to the political processes which were essential to ensure that FASD was recognised and addressed in Australia’s health agenda. A powerful and informed advocate, Professor Elliott has been a keynote, invited, or abstract presenter at numerous conferences, symposia and related events including International FASD Conferences in Canada, the Royal Society of Medicine London, the first International conference on FASD prevention in Edmonton, the European FASD conference, and a WHO Global Alcohol meeting. Professor Elliott is currently Co-Chair of the 2nd Australasian FASD Conference 2018. She has contributed to alcohol policies and statements developed by the WHO, NHMRC, Royal Australasian College of Physicians and the Australian Medical Association. She is a Champion for the Pregnant Pause Campaign and a NOFASD Ambassador.

Education of Health Professionals

The availability and accessibility of medical education and training related to FASD has been furthered by Professor Elliott through a number of projects. She currently leads the development of a national FASD information hub (FASD Hub Australia) and a national FASD Registry. She supported the Foundation for Alcohol Research and Education (FARE) – Women Want to Know project designed to increase health professional knowledge of effective advice and guidance around alcohol and pregnancy; and jointly led development of the Australian Guide to the Diagnosis of FASD and production of e-modules, and contributed to NSW Health resources on FASD for indigenous services.

Quality Health Care

As a health care provider Professor Elliott’s commitment to quality health and medical care for families is evident in her role as Co-Director of the CICADA Centre for Care and Intervention for Children and Adolescents affected by Drugs and Alcohol and Head of the NSW FASD Service.

Public Campaigns

Professor Elliott has initiated and been involved in many public campaigns related to FASD. She has been a witness for inquiries into FASD in Australia, alcohol use in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders, and Advertising of Alcohol in New South Wales. For NOFASD Australia, Professor Elliott recently supported the Pregnant, Planning or Could Be initiative, an in-reach to 600 medical clinics across greater Sydney. She was involved in developing the Charter for the Prevention of FASD.

Professor Elliott is regularly approached by the media on matters related to FASD, and her work has strengthened Australia’s health systems and their capacity to respond to FASD.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FYsKCxa1AG0

She has also produced DVDs and videos to educate professionals across Australia and worldwide. Of one FARE Australia wrote: written and narrated by one of Australia’s leaders in the field, paediatrician Professor Elizabeth Elliott from the University of Sydney, this video is a ‘must watch’ for anyone that is involved in the care and education of children.

The story of alcohol use in pregnancy from FAREAustralia on Vimeo.

https://vimeo.com/100859137

Professor Elliott is a Distinguished Professor in Paediatrics and Child Health in the Sydney University School of Medicine and Health Sciences; Consultant Paediatrician at the Sydney Children’s Hospitals Network, Westmead; Fellow of the Australian Academy of Health and Medical Sciences; and an NHMRC Medical Research Futures Fund Practitioner Fellow. In 2008 she was made a Member of the Order of Australia for services to paediatrics and child health. In 2018 she received the Australian Medical Association’s Excellence in Healthcare Award for her contributions to FASD.

Professor Elliott was presented with her award by AMA President, Dr Michael Gannon, at the AMA National Conference in Canberra.

Sue Miers, the founder of NOFASD Australia, describes Professor Elliott as instrumental in increasing knowledge and awareness, shifting attitudes and developing service delivery for FASD in Australia.

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